Choosing Door Handles and Knobs

At Murphy Larkin we are committed to sourcing and selling beautiful doors and the handles and knobs that complement these doors are an integral part of our business. Our website and showrooms display a variety of doorknobs suiting a vast range of doors. We constantly strive to keep up with modern trends here at Murphy Larkin and door handles are no exception.

As ever silver accessories throughout the home continue to be hugely popular and this extends to door handles.

 

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Sleek and simple handles like this Fortessa Amalfi satin polished handle (above) carry an enduring appeal and cast a modern finish onto any door be that a new or existing door.

 

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If seeking a more traditional look in door handles, the Black Fleur de Lys Handle Set (above) has a beautiful gothic look that would compliment all Red Deal doors, white doors and any traditional cottage style door.

Similarly, door knobs are just as effective to aesthetically set off any of our doors. We stock a wide selection of knobs ranging from the fantastically fancy to the beautifully basic.

Crackle Knob

 

This Delamain Crackle Porcelain Bronze Door knob (above) is one of our most popular door knobs and will give a classical traditional look to your interior doors. This knob contains a special ivory crackle glaze and florentine brass finish. 

We also stock a number of crystal door knobs. The Delamain blue and pink crystal knob (below) would be perfect for setting off a door to a unique or special room in your home. 

 

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When looking at a more basic but no less aesthetically pleasing door knobs, the Fulton & Bray Oval Mortice Knob (below) manufactured in brass with a high quality plated finish and will provide a sleek finish to any door.

ZB200 copy

 

These are a sample of the handles and knobs that we have in stock, for a full selection of our door accessories visit our website murphylarkin.com. Please feel free to post your thoughts and comments below. If you would like further information or you have any other questions about choosing or fitting doors please call our customer services team on 051 391821 (Tramore) 052 6121536 (Clonmel).

 

 

#doorhandles #doorknobs

Walnut Doors Changing colour

Many of you will notice that your new walnut doors will have started to change colour. This is a natural effect which is due to the sunlight the door receives.  We have added some images from both of our showrooms walnut shaker doors  and traditional 6 panel walnut doors to see the effects of UV sunlight. #Walnutdoors

Faded Walnut shaker door

Faded Walnut shaker door

 

#walnutdoors

#walnut

#walnutflooring

#walnutflooring

The 6 panel door above shows colouring of the walnut door after approximately 2.5 – 3 years. We have also shown the fade line on the walnut flooring. love to here your comments and thoughts on the subject. For further information please contact us, or feel free to leave a comment below.  www.murphylarkin.com

 

Home Renovation Incentive scheme

we often get asked about the new Home Renovation scheme. we got this information for revenue today. This Should help answer some of your Questions.

Home Renovation Incentive (HRI)

Introduction

The Home Renovation Incentive was announced by the Minister for Finance in his budget speech on 15th October 2013 as a means of incentivising the construction sector, in particular the smaller contractors. There has been considerable interest in the scheme which has been supported by media advertising by businesses in the construction sector and by various announcements of financial support from banks, credit unions, etc.

What types of work qualify?

The work must be carried out on a person’s main or principal private residence and qualifying works can include extensions, painting and decorating, plumbing, tiling, plastering, supply and fitting of windows, supply and fitting of kitchens, bathroom upgrades, landscaping, etc., which qualify for the rate of 13.5% VAT. The work can be carried out as one job or on a phased basis and it can be carried out by one or more Contractors.

Qualifying contractors

The incentive is designed to support tax compliant contractors who must be registered for VAT. To operate under the Home Renovation Incentive, a compliant contractor is one who qualifies for the 0% or 20% rate of RCT.

The works must cost a minimum of €4,405 (before VAT), which will attract a credit of €595. Where the cost of the works exceeds €30,000, a maximum credit of €4,050 will apply. This translates into a tax credit of between €595 or €4,050, so it’s not going to be a cheque in the post from the revenue. The credit is payable over the two years following the year in which the work is carried out and paid for. 2015 will be the first year for the HRI tax credits.

Example:

If Murphy Larkin Timber Products replaces your Doors,Floors Etc in June 2014 for a cost of €5000 + VAT, we will enter the details to the electronic HRI system.

This will have to be done within 28 days of the work starting. This application form has to include the house owner’s name, assigned ID number, a description of the work, the address, the estimated cost and the anticipated start and finishing dates.

You claim your tax credit in January 2015.

Your tax credit is €5000 x 13.5% = €675

You will receive your tax credit of €337.50 in 2015 and €337.50 in 2016.

 

Input of HRI works and payments to Revenue’s electronic system

All works and payments will have to be registered electronically with Revenue when the electronic HRI system is available in early April. You will need the property ID from the homeowner in order to enter HRI work on the electronic system. The property ID was included on all Local Property Tax letters issued to homeowners by Revenue. If you have not already done so, you might consider obtaining this information from your customers now to avoid delays when the system goes live.

if you have any further questions, please contact us on 051 391821.

www.murphylarkin.com

#HriScheme

#homeinsentivescheme

A Pocket Door is a Neat, Stylish, Sliding Door Solution

doors-cat-bannerPocket doors will not only provide a superb space saving door opening but will add an architectural detail to your interiors. You can use Pocket Doors in both traditional and contemporary interiors. Double or French pocket doors have been used in grand homes for hundreds of years to give an elegant transition between room; classic colonial styles were a favourite. A pocket door is an ideal solution for kitchens and bathrooms when floor space simply isn’t there to accommodate a full swinging door, particularly for en-suite bathrooms.
Pocket door

So, what is a pocket door? A pocket door has a top sliding mechanism, which runs within the cavity between two faces of a wall. This is generally an internal wall but can be created on exterior walls (usually in warmer climates and where security is not an issue). Ideally you need to plan for installation of a Pocket Door, as the cavity in the wall needs to be constructed prior to installation. So if creating a new build or renovating your home it is worth consideration at the design planning stage. Having said that internal walls can be easily adapted by constructing a second skin leaving a cavity for the door.

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The Pocket Door system is not only useful when there is limited floor area they can provide easier opening for disabled access. In addition Pocket Doors give a streamlined appearance when furniture or fitments need to be near the door opening.
Pocket doors also give the opportunity to use interesting hardware, which is often the adornment of the door and of the home. Resist using a basic pull handle
, as there are some very stylish options available that will enhance the look of this special door!

 

pocket Doors

pocket Doorse are some very stylish options available that will enhance the look of this special door!

Pocket Doors

Pocket Doors  

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Murphy Larkin Doors

doors-cat-bannerAt Murphy Larkin Doors we are asked a variety of questions related to buying and fitting new timber doors and one that comes up fairly often is which way a door should be hung. This is an interesting question and there is some debate, in some situations, over the most appropriate way of hanging a door. First of all it is worth pointing out that there are in fact four different options for the direction of swing.


Firstly there are two sides to the door. When fitting an External Door and you are standing outside your door facing it, you can have the hinge on the left or the right hand side and this determines whether you have a left handed door (hinges on the left) or a right handed door (hinges on the right). In addition, many external timber doors have raised panels and/or beading on one face, which is meant to be facing the exterior as this beading is there for practical reasons along with aesthetics. Generally an external door should push into the property away from you.
Note: hinges should be fitted on the inner side of the door (not seen from outside) for security.

For Internal doors the general rule is to open into the room, as you can imagine in a hallway with numerous doors it could be impractical if doors extended into the hall. Of course in certain situations it may be necessary to have the door pull towards you. If the door pushes inside away from you this is called a regular swing, if the door pulls towards you this is known as a reverse swing door.

There isn’t a definitive guide on what is right or wrong for domestic properties, though some building regulations and listed building advice may need to be adhered to, so it is really up to the homeowner on which side the hinges are positioned and which direction the door will swing. However there are a couple of things that you may wish to consider in choosing which side to hang your door. You may wish to think about, will the door cover the light switch? Will the position of the furniture get in the way? Similarly, you will want to avoid two doors being too close when both are opened. If you are short of opening space due to fitments or furniture, particularly in workrooms or under stairs cupboards then it is worth considering internal Bi-Fold Doors, some styles are available to match regular Internal Doors. Ideally you will aim to be consistent within your home with all doors swinging the same way to avoid confusion.

Should a Door Swing In or Out? – Guidance for hanging a Timber Door

doors-cat-bannerAt Murphy Larkin  we are asked a variety of questions related to buying and fitting new timber doors and one that comes up fairly often is which way a door should be hung. This is an interesting question and there is some debate, in some situations, over the most appropriate way of hanging a door. First of all it is worth pointing out that there are in fact four different options for the direction of swing.

Firstly there are two sides to the door. When fitting an External Door and you are standing outside your door facing it, you can have the hinge on the left or the right hand side and this determines whether you have a left handed door (hinges on the left) or a right handed door (hinges on the right). In addition, many external timber doors have raised panels and/or beading on one face, which is meant to be facing the exterior as this beading is there for practical reasons along with aesthetics. Generally an external door should push into the property away from you.
Note: hinges should be fitted on the inner side of the door (not seen from outside) for security.

For Internal doors the general rule is to open into the room, as you can imagine in a hallway with numerous doors it could be impractical if doors extended into the hall. Of course in certain situations it may be necessary to have the door pull towards you. If the door pushes inside away from you this is called a regular swing, if the door pulls towards you this is known as a reverse swing door.

There isn’t a definitive guide on what is right or wrong for domestic properties, though some building regulations and listed building advice may need to be adhered to, so it is really up to the homeowner on which side the hinges are positioned and which direction the door will swing. However there are a couple of things that you may wish to consider in choosing which side to hang your door. You may wish to think about, will the door cover the light switch? Will the position of the furniture get in the way? Similarly, you will want to avoid two doors being too close when both are opened. If you are short of opening space due to fitments or furniture, particularly in workrooms or under stairs cupboards then it is worth considering internal Bi-Fold Doors, some styles are available to match regular Internal Doors. Ideally you will aim to be consistent within your home with all doors swinging the same way to avoid confusion.

If you would like further information or you have any other questions about choosing or fitting doors please call our customer services team on 051 391821 052 6121536
www.murphylarkin.com

Door Swing Types

Door Swing Types